Jeanine Connor | Collinsville Real Estate, Troy Real Estate, Maryville Real Estate


If you want to streamline the home selling journey, it usually is a good idea to develop goals. That way, you can identify any potential home selling challenges and address them before you list your residence.

Ultimately, there are many problems that may arise during the home selling journey, and these include:

1. Poor Curb Appeal

How your home looks to buyers is key. If your residence fails to impress buyers when they see it for the first time, these individuals are unlikely to schedule a house showing. As a result, your home may linger on the real estate market for an extended period of time.

Devote time and energy to improve your house's curb appeal – you will be happy you did. By mowing the lawn, removing dirt and debris from exterior walkways and performing other home exterior upgrades, you can make your home an attractive option to buyers. You may even differentiate your residence from the competition – something that may lead to a successful home selling experience.

2. Cluttered Interior

If your home is full of personal belongings, you may want to remove some of these items. By doing so, you can show buyers the full potential of your residence.

For those who want to cut down on clutter, there are many options. Oftentimes, it helps to rent a storage unit that allows you to keep your belongings safe until your residence sells. On the other hand, if you want to get rid of excess items, you can host a yard sale, list your items online or give these items to family members, friends or local charities.

3. Exorbitant Home Price

An exorbitant initial home asking price may be an instant turn-off for buyers. Fortunately, if you analyze the local housing market and your residence, you can establish a competitive initial asking price for your home.

Evaluate the prices of available homes in your area that are similar to your own. Also, you may want to conduct a house appraisal and review an appraisal report. With this information at your disposal, you can price your house competitively.

As you get set to enter the housing market, you may want to employ a real estate agent, too. This housing market professional will help you establish realistic home selling goals, as well as determine the best steps to help you achieve your aspirations.

A real estate agent is committed to a home seller's success, and he or she will do what it takes to help you thrive. If you want to sell your residence as quickly as possible, for instance, a real estate agent can help you do just that. Or, if you want to optimize your house sale earnings, a real estate agent will ensure you can get the best price for your home.

Ready to add your home to the real estate market? Develop home selling goals, and you may be better equipped than ever before to enjoy a fast, profitable house selling experience.


If you’re planning on buying a new home sometime in the near future, you may be wondering when the best time of year to buy a home really is. There’s many theories about when the best time of year to buy a home is. It’s widely known that inventory on homes available for sale picks up in spring. That means that inventory increases, but so too does the volume of competition for people who are buying homes. Just because spring is busy, in real estate that doesn’t mean that it’s necessarily the best time to buy. 


Spring is, however, a great time to sell your home. The same goes for the summer as the buying frenzy continues right into the fall for most home buyers. As a buyer or a seller, you’ll want to have a good understanding of the housing market no matter what time of year you’re making your property transactions. Whether you’re buying or selling, you’ll want to know how to get the best bang for your buck. While many people are ready for a change after the long winter months, yet, many people can hold out through other times of the year. 


The Market Changes With The Seasons


As the seasons change, so too do the number of people selling versus the number of people who are looking to buy. If you don’t mind the competition and know what you’re looking for, any time is a good time to buy. As a buyer, you’ll either be facing low inventory, tough competition, or a combination of the two. If you’re scoping out the type of home you’d like to live in, you’ll want to browse in the spring. Have your pre-approval ready just in case you find a home you love at the right price. If you’re not in a rush, spring shopping can give you a good idea of what’s out there for you. You’ll be able to narrow down the type of home you want and where you’d like to live when the time is right.


There’s Really No Golden Rule For Timing


When it comes to buying and selling real estate, there is no sweet spot during the year as to when you’ll have better luck. Being prepared and understanding the trends in your area are a good start. When you hire the right real estate agent, they can be your advocate throughout the process of either buying or selling. Agents can research different trends from the time of year that properties are sold in a certain neighborhood right through to the correct pricing for a home just like yours or the one you are looking for.


Ready to sell your house? Ultimately, you should conduct a home appraisal before you add your residence to the housing market, and for good reason.

A home appraisal enables you to better understand what your home is worth. Plus, an expert home appraiser will be able to offer comprehensive insights into your house's strengths and weaknesses so you can prioritize assorted home improvement projects accordingly.

Preparing your home for an appraisal may prove to be exceedingly valuable. If you allocate time and resources to get your house ready for an appraisal, you can increase your chances of getting favorable results during the appraisal itself.

What does it take to prep your house for an appraisal? Here are three tips to ensure you can do just that.

1. Consider a Home Appraiser's Perspective.

A home appraiser has an eye for detail, one that helps this professional understand whether a house is a viable long-term investment. Meanwhile, a home seller who steps into a property appraiser's shoes may be better equipped than others to enhance his or her residence.

For example, a home seller should evaluate a house's interior and exterior prior to an appraisal. And if you notice chipped paint on a home's walls, cracked shingles on a home's exterior or other cosmetic issues, you should address these problems immediately.

Even minor cosmetic issues can negatively affect a home's value. However, a home seller who goes above and beyond the call of duty to correct these problems may be able to improve his or her house's appearance before a home appraisal.

2. Conduct Plenty of Housing Market Research.

How does your residence stack up against the competition? Learn about the local housing market, and you can find out what you'll need to do to differentiate your residence from similar properties.

An home seller should learn about the prices of recently sold residences as well as homes that are currently available. That way, you can set realistic expectations for your home appraisal.

3. Collaborate with a Real Estate Agent.

A home appraisal can be a stressful experience, especially for a first-time home seller. Lucky for you, real estate agents are available to help you streamline the home appraisal process.

Typically, a real estate agent will guide you along the home selling process. He or she can connect you with qualified home appraisers in your area and ensure you can find a home appraiser who will provide honest, unbiased feedback about your residence.

A real estate agent also will help you maximize the value of your house. This housing market professional will ensure you can set a fair price for your residence and market your home to the right groups of homebuyers. He or she will even set up home showings and open houses and negotiate with homebuyers on your behalf to further simplify the home selling process.

When it comes to getting a home appraisal, there is no need to worry. Use the aforementioned tips, and you can plan ahead for a home appraisal.


When a house is sold, it’s generally expected that the seller will take all of their personal belongings along with them. This includes furniture, pictures, cleaning supplies, and appliances that weren’t included on the deal. This is all in the expectation that the buyer will have a clean property to move into. 

If a seller does leave personal property behind, what are the rights of the buyer? Buyers may wonder if they can move in and actually take possession of the home if belongings have been left behind. There are a few reasons that buyers may leave property behind including:

  • The item is actually a fixture and not considered personal property
  • The item could belong to a tenant (or former tenant)

In these circumstances, each state determines different rights and procedures that must happen in order for the property to be secured without hassle by the buying party.


What If There’s So Much Stuff It Impedes On Moving In?


In the case that a seller has left so many things that a buyer cannot even comfortably move into the property, the contract may be refused. If there’s an inordinate amount of furniture, trash, and personal belongings, you certainly have a good argument to not sign the final contract for the property. Your rights as a buyer do, however, depend on what exactly was written into the purchase contract for the home you’re buying. 

Hidden Items

If an item has been deemed hidden or buried, the buyers have a different circumstance on their hands. Many times, a buyer is obligated to hang onto these items for the seller. The items were not technically abandoned by the seller to the buyer. The buyer becomes what is called a “bailor,” or a keeper of the property, who needs to be an agent in the change of possession of the items.  

Possession Unknown

If the ownership of an item is unknown, the terms of the contract are held up. Standard contracts generally state that any items left behind by the seller have been forfeited to the buyer. If the contract says nothing about personal property, the buyer generally takes on the role of “bailor” again in this instance.

If The Property Owner Has Died Or The Property Has Been Abandoned


If a property has been abandoned due to foreclosure or bankruptcy, or the property owner has died, any personal property that is left behind is a bit more of a risk for both parties. These circumstances generally state that a buyer will be taking on a property “as is” and essentially anything left is the buyer’s problem. 


If a property owner has died, the executors generally take on the responsibility of removing items from the property to be distributed to the rightful beneficiaries. Occasionally, this process doesn’t work out due to family quarrels. In this case, personal property of the seller goes into the category of forfeiture. 

Personal property is just one reason why you need to understand your legal rights when you’re buying a home.


Let's face it – clutter can be problematic, particularly for those who want to list a home in the near future. Lucky for you, we're here to help you cut down on clutter so you can add your residence to the real estate market as soon as possible.

Now, let's take a look at three tips that you can use to remove clutter before your list your residence.

1. Rent a Storage Unit

A storage unit offers a great way to protect your belongings while you sell your home. Then, once a homebuyer agrees to purchase your house, you can move your belongings from your storage unit into a new residence.

The price to rent a storage unit often varies based on the size and location of the unit. Therefore, you should shop around to find a storage unit rental that matches your budget.

Also, consider the items that you'll want to keep in a storage unit. If you find that the value of your belongings is less than the rental price of a storage unit, you may want to consider other options to declutter your residence.

2. Host a Yard Sale

A yard sale provides a wonderful opportunity to declutter your residence and earn extra cash at the same time.

Remember, one person's trash is another's treasure. Although you might no longer have a need for some belongings, these items could be valuable to the right buyer.

The best time to host a yard sale usually is a Saturday or Sunday morning. Before your yard sale, you should set up posters around your city or town to advertise your event. That way, you can stir up plenty of interest in your yard sale.

In addition, you may be able to sell items without leaving your couch. Listing some of your excess belongings online allows you to promote a broad array of items to a large audience.

3. Donate Items to Charity

If you're in a hurry to declutter, many charities may be willing to pick up household appliances, furniture and other items without delay. In some cases, you might be able to donate these items and receive a tax deduction as well.

Search for charities in your city or town and contact them directly to find out if they accept donations. Next, you can set up a date and time for a charity representative to pick up your items, or you may be able to drop off the items at a nearby location.

Decluttering your home may seem like an uphill climb, but a real estate agent may be able to provide additional assistance.

A real estate agent can evaluate your home and offer expert tips to help you declutter. As a result, you can revamp your house's interior and ensure your residence looks amazing before you add it to the housing market.

Take the guesswork out of decluttering your residence. Use the aforementioned tips, and you should have no trouble eliminating clutter from your home.